ABC Odd Man Out As NBC Denounces Cuba's 'Communist Dictatorship' - Africa News Quick
  • July 13, 2021

ABC Odd Man Out As NBC Denounces Cuba’s ‘Communist Dictatorship’

Following the leader of the CBS evening news who admitted that the “communist regime” was responsible for all the problems in Cuba the night before, on Tuesday NBC Nightly News he saw correspondent Morgan Radford call out the island’s “communist dictatorship” over “severe food shortages” and the crackdown on free speech. He also highlighted legitimately excited Cuban Americans protesting in solidarity with those who were fighting for their freedom.

And while Radford blamed the “communist dictatorship” for the plight of the Cuban people, ABC correspondent Victor Oquendo provided little context on World news tonight for actual protests.

“Protesters calling for freedom as food and medicine shortages devastate the island,” he reported near the end of the segment. But there was no explanation why they would be “asking for freedom.”

After NBC presenter Lester Holt led the segment reporting that “Cuban state media reports that a man was killed and several protesters and security officials were injured during anti-government demonstrations,” Radford played back-to-back videos of the protesters. in the Little Havana neighborhood of Miami, Florida, asking the United States for help:

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN 1: A change is coming and it’s time for a change.

(…)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN 2: This is now a life or death situation.

(…)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN 3: They are starving, there is literally a shortage of food, there is a shortage of doctors and the Cuban people need help.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN 4: What will be needed? If it doesn’t happen now, when will it happen?

“Where Cubans on the island are grappling with severe food shortages, rising COVID cases and a communist dictatorship that is cutting off the internet as protesters cry out for help,” he said. “His outrage and despair captured by a viral hit song called ‘Patria Y Vida'”.

Radford touted how the song, which meant “homeland and life” in English, was “a twist on the communist-era catchphrase ‘homeland or death’ which means homeland or death.” He also spoke with one of the song’s co-creators, “Cuban musician Yotuel Romero, who fled Cuba 25 years ago.”

Together, they talked about how the song was about “life”, “the most important thing”:

YOTUEL ROMERO: [Speaking Spanish]

RADFORD: Did you change that motto?

ROMERO: Yes. [Speaking Spanish].

RADFORD: You traded death for life.

ROMERO: Yes, of course. We need life.

RADFORD: We need life.

ROMERO: Yes.

RADFORD: Very important.

ROMERO: Very important.

RADFORD: It’s the most important thing.

He says they are fighting because his family on the island cannot.

“Just today, Cuban authorities arrested activist Dina Stars while expressing her views on a news channel in Spanish,” Radford warned. “Romero was on the show when it happened live.”

Radford concluded his report with one last protester who shouted: “They need your freedom. They deserve it. It has been enough. It’s enough. It’s enough “.

The transcript is below, click “expand” to read:

NBC Nightly News
July 13, 2021
7:15:20 pm ET

LESTER HOLT: In Cuba, state media is reporting that a man was killed and several protesters and security officials were injured during anti-government demonstrations, as support for the uprising here in the United States grows. We have more information on this from Morgan Radford.

[Cuts to video]

MORGAN RADFORD: A third day of protests in Miami.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN 1: A change is coming and it’s time for a change.

RADFORD: Some protesters blocked traffic, many Cuban-Americans, concerned for the family at home.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN 2: This is now a life or death situation.

RADFORD: Where Cubans on the island are grappling with severe food shortages, rising COVID cases, and a communist dictatorship that is cutting off the internet as protesters cry out for help.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN 3: They are starving, there is literally a shortage of food, there is a shortage of doctors and the Cuban people need help.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN 4: What will be needed? If it doesn’t happen now, when will it happen?

RADFORD: Your outrage and despair captured by a viral song called “Patria Y Vida.”

[Clip of the song and on-screen translation: My people cry and feel their voice.]

RADFORD: It means homeland and life, a twist on the communist-era slogan “homeland or death” which means homeland or death. The Cuban musician Yotuel Romero, who fled Cuba 25 years ago, is one of its creators.

YOTUEL ROMERO: [Speaking Spanish]

RADFORD: Did you change that motto?

ROMERO: Yes. [Speaking Spanish].

RADFORD: You traded death for life.

ROMERO: Yes, of course. We need life.

RADFORD: We need life.

ROMERO: Yes.

RADFORD: Very important.

ROMERO: Very important.

RADFORD: It’s the most important thing.

He says they are fighting because his family on the island cannot. Just today, Cuban authorities detained activist Dina Stars while expressing her views on a Spanish news channel.

DINA STARS (in Spanish, via on-screen translation): Security is out.

RADFORD: Romero was on the show when it happened live.

ROSEMARY: [Speaking Spanish].

RADFORD: Did you think that could have been my daughter? [Speaking Spanish] Nobody knows where it is?

ROSEMARY: [Speaking Spanish] [Shaking his head]

RADFORD: So far, the Biden administration is not intervening, but has issued a statement in support of the Cuban people. This, as the president of Cuba, blames the protests on the United States government and its embargo, but Romero says that this movement is for Cubans and by Cubans.

ROSEMARY: [Speaking Spanish]

RADFORD: There is nothing more beautiful than freedom.

And this, he says, is just the beginning.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN 5: They need their freedom. They deserve it. It has been enough. It’s enough. It’s enough.

RADFORD: Morgan Radford, NBC News, Miami.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.